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Forest Culture

Thu, Sep 26/19 – 6:30pm to 8:00pm

Main Hall, 1 Spadina Crescent

This event is part of the "Hindsight is 20/20" public programming series at the Daniels Faculty.

Forest Culture:
A panel discussion featuring noted experts in the field of forestry, including Dan Handel, Stephanie Seymour, and Scott Jackson.

Registration is now open for this event — click here to register.

Moderator/Host:

Brigitte Shim is a Professor at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto and  a principal at Shim-Sutcliffe Architects. She has been teaching at the Daniels Faculty since 1988, and has overseen core design studios, advanced design studios, thesis studios, and courses in the history and theory of landscape architecture. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, Shim graduated from the University of Waterloo with degrees in Environmental Studies and Architecture.

Speakers:

Dan Handel is an architect and curator whose work focuses on research-based exhibitions with special attention to underexplored ideas, figures, and practices that shape contemporary built environments. He was the inaugural Young Curator at the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal, has developed exhibitions for the Venice Biennale and the New Institute in Rotterdam, and was curator of architecture and design at the Israel Museum. Handel holds an MArch from the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and a PhD from the Technion Israel Institute of Technology. His writing has appeared in Harvard Design Magazine, e-flux Architecture, Thresholds, Frame, San Rocco, Pin-Up, Bracket, and the Journal of Landscape Architecture, among others. He is the editor of the publications Aircraft Carrier (Hajte Cantz, 2012), Yasky and Co. (Tel Aviv Museum. 2016), and Manifest, a journal of American architecture and urbanism. He is the recipient of grants from the Graham Foundation for Manifest (2012, 2014) and Carpet Space (2019)

Stephanie Seymour is an Anishinaabe-kwe from Garden River First Nation who is currently conducting research for her PhD in forest sciences at Lakehead University. Her research focuses on the potential for forests to reduce or eliminate diesel use in remote Ojibwe and Cree communities in northwestern Ontario, from both a scientific and holistic approach. Stephanie has a knowledge of historical and modern issues facing Indigenous people, as well as a background in forestry and resource development and management. Her knowledge about natural resources and Indigenous people is complemented by her understanding of policies that affect both resources and people. Throughout her education journey, Stephanie has used her ability to see the forest through the trees, and water and resource management from different perspectives. Stephanie’s experience is shaped by both her formal education and her experiences in her community and her families. By offering an objective and balanced perspective, Stephanie promotes a collegial and collaborative relationship between Indigenous people and industries, governments, and organizations. As an Indigenous student and scholar, Stephanie hopes to inspire other Indigenous youth to bring the voices of Indigenous people into the academy and to build bridges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities while promoting sustainable development and use of natural resources.  In addition to her academic accomplishments, Stephanie volunteers her time to serve as the Lakehead University Native Students Association (LUNSA) representative on the Lakehead University Ogimaawin-Aboriginal Governance Council (O-AGC). Stephanie is dedicated to working with Aboriginal youth. She visits local and regional high schools to deliver the Aboriginal Mentorship Program (AMP) as an assistant coordinator.

Scott Jackson has over 20 years of experience in the field of natural resource policy and conservation science. Prior to joining Forests Ontario, Scott spent 13 years as the manager of forest policy for the Ontario Forest Industries Association (OFIA), an organization that acts as the provincial voice for the forest sector in Ontario. At the OFIA, Scott's responsibilities included the analysis of government policy and the development and promotion of forest sector policy positions with senior levels of government. He also acted as a key liaison to other resource sectors, municipal government officials, and non-governmental organizations. Scott has an undergraduate degree in environmental biology (Queen’s University) and a Masters in Forest Conservation (University of Toronto). Following his graduate studies, he spent multiple field seasons conducting research on reduced-impact logging techniques and post-harvest regeneration in Brazil and Bolivia. Scott is currently the director of Indigenous and stakeholder relations at Forests Ontario, a not-for-profit charity dedicated to re-greening the province through the support of forest restoration, stewardship, education, and awareness. Scott is responsible for overseeing the It Takes a Forest initiative, a collaborative program led by Forests Ontario and local, like-minded individuals and organizations that delivers fact-based information to the public about forests and forest products, and the role they play in sustaining our growing economy, mitigating climate change, and creating healthy environments.

Doors will open at 6pm. Ticket holders must arrive by 6:20pm (with their printed or mobile ticket) to claim their seats. There will be a rush line for those without tickets. Any unclaimed seats will be released to the rush line at 6:20pm.