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03.27.18 – Elisa Julia Gilmour (MVS 2016) among the winners of the 2018 New Generation Photography Award

Congratulations to Daniels Faculty alumna Elisa Julia Gilmour (MVS 2016) on winning the 2018 New Generation Photography Award sponsored by Scotiabank. Meryl McMaster and Deanna Pizzitelli also received the award, which was given in recognition and support of young artists in Canada “to help them reach their infinite potential.”

As stated in the press release:
 

Elisa Julia Gilmour is an emerging Canadian artist producing still and moving images. Her work engages with the notion of ephemerality through gestural storytelling. Her most recent project, Éperdument (Madly) (2016), which included a three-channel video installation and a publication of short stories, investigates how a Corsican mythological figure has enlivened a contemporary sense of identity. She has exhibited at the Art Museum at the University of Toronto, the Ryerson Image Centre and the Art Gallery of Mississauga.
 

The prize was awarded to “exhibited artists working in lens-based art.” A jury consisting of “Canadian and international photography experts, artists, and leaders in the community” selected the winners from a longlist that was announced in February.
 
The winners, in addition to being awarded a cash prize of $10,000 each, will be featured in two exhibitions: a group exhibition at the Canadian Photography Institute PhotoLab in Ottawa (April 13-August 19), followed by a second exhibition at OCAD’s Onsite Gallery during Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival in Toronto (May 5 -June 17). 

OCAD University will also be hosting a New Generation Photography Award Panel Talk with the three award recipients. For event details, visit their website.

For more information about the New Generation Photography Award and other prizes and events by the Canadian Photography Institute and Scotiabank, head over to their website: www.scotiabank.com/arts

Photos above from Elisa Julia Gilmour's Master of Visual Studies thesis Éperdument (Madly) - film stills and installation view from the thesis exhibition at U of T's Art Museum.