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Course Descriptions & Timetables

Course timetables list the current course offerings for a given term and their enrolment controls. For Daniels Faculty course descriptions, prerequisites, exclusions, and breadth requirements, please see the Daniels Faculty Academic Calendar.

Please note that not all courses listed in the academic calendar are offered every year. Several unique Daniels Faculty course descriptions can be found below, including Design/Build studios, Summer Abroad studios, and Advanced Topics courses.

For Arts & Science course descriptions, prerequisites, exclusions, and breadth requirements, please see the Faculty of Arts & Science 2020-21 Timetable

Timetables

Current Timetables*

Archived Timetables

*If course offering or scheduling information on ACORN and the Timetable do not match, this Timetable will reflect the most updated course offering information. Contact registrar@daniels.utoronto.ca if you have any questions..

How to Read a Timetable

The Academic Timetable provides course meeting information (day, time, location, enrolment conditions) for the current Fall/Winter and Summer sessions. The Daniels Faculty undergraduate timetable includes all undergraduate Architectural Studies [ARC], Visual Studies [VIS], and Joint Architectural Studies and Visual Studies courses [JAV].

ARC, VIS, and JAV course descriptions, including prerequisites, and Architectural Studies and Visual Studies program requirements are listed in the Daniels Faculty Undergraduate Academic Calendar. 

The primary meeting section of Daniels undergraduate courses may either be an L (LEC; Lecture) or P (PRA; Practical) meeting section. Waitlists are only available for a course’s primary meeting section.

The Lecture is the primary meeting section for all courses with a Lecture only or a Lecture and a Tutorial (T; TUT). If there is more than one Lecture section listed, select the one that is offered at the time most convenient for your schedule. If the course has both Lecture and Tutorial sections, you must enrol in one of each.

The Practical is the primary meeting section for all courses with a Practical only or a Practical and a Lecture, with the exception of ARC302H1.* If there is more than one Practical section listed, select the one that is offered at the time most convenient for your schedule. If the course has both Practical and Lecture sections, you must enrol in one of each.

*The primary meeting section for ARC302H1 is the Lecture. You must enrol in both the Lecture and the Practical.

Time
M=Monday; T=Tuesday; W=Wednesday; R=Thursday; F=Friday; S=Saturday

Note: Classes begin at 10 minutes after the hour and finish on the hour unless otherwise stated.

Section Code
F = first or fall term (September to December)
S = second or winter/spring term (January to April)
Y = fall and winter/spring sessions (September to April)

Enrolment Indicator
Enrolment indicators identify how enrolment controls are being used and/or alert you to different enrolment processes.

Enrolment Indicator If you meet the Enrolment Control listed on the Timetable If you do not meet the Enrolment Control Special Notes
          P

You have priority to enrol on ACORN from your enrolment start date. Once priority enrolment closes, spaces will be made available to all students.

You may enrol on ACORN once priority enrolment closes.

 
          R

You may enrol on ACORN beginning on your enrolment start date at your start time.

This course is restricted and you may not enrol if you do not meet the enrolment control.

 
          E

Enrolment is done at the Department (not on ACORN). Refer to the departmental enrolment instructions on the Timetable listings.

This course is restricted and you may not enrol if you do not meet the enrolment control.

To cancel an E course, go to the Department or your Registrar's office prior to the stated drop deadline.

Room Codes
The building code refers to the campus map and are those used in the Timetable and course listings.

Download the UofT Map App to find classroom locations or view the building list at:
http://map.utoronto.ca/c/getApp        
http://map.utoronto.ca/c/buildings

Exclusions

Students may not enrol in a course that lists as an exclusion a course they are currently taking, a course they have already passed, or a course for which they have been given transfer credit. If they enrol in such a course, they may be removed at any time during the enrolment period or during the session. Additional details can be reviewed in the Academic Calendar.

Students may request to take the course as an EXT after the priority period, if there is space.This can be done by emailing registrar@daniels.utoronto.ca after the priority period.

Fall/Winter 2020-21 Course Descriptions

ARC 400-Level Advanced Topics

The Advanced Topics courses listed below are distinct credit offerings, and eligible students can enrol in more than one of the following courses, despite repeating course codes. For example, students can complete in ARC451H1F LEC0101 and ARC451H1S LEC9101, as their course content will differ depending on the instructor. Please note that a section number LEC9101 denotes an online course offering.

The Fall/Winter 2020-21 ARC 400-level Advanced Topics Balloting webform can be found here. The deadline to submit is Thursday, August 6th at 9:00am EST.

  • ARC451H1F 1 LEC9102: Advanced Topics in History and Theory of Architecture: Architecture & the Sea
    Instructor: Christy Anderson

We live on a watery world. Yet too often we ignore the connection between our buildings and the sea that is all around us. This course will look at the history of port cities, maritime infrastructure, ships, shoreline interactions, and island habitations. As sea levels rise, we will study examples of the terraqueous constructions from the ancient world to the present day and how architects are by necessity thinking more about an increasingly liquid landscape. Students will develop projects through the lens of history and environmental criticism.

  • ARC452H1F LEC9101: Advanced Topics in History and Theory of Landscape Architecture: Charismatic Landscapes: Zones of Exclusion
    Instructor: Elise Hunchuck

This seminar will consider the diverse and charismatic landscapes of exclusion zones of the twentieth and twenty-first century. This includes border zones, construction zones, military exclusion zones, and nuclear disaster exclusion zones, among others, across the Americas, Asia, and Europe. We will examine case studies that include the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone of Ukraine, the Polesie State Radioecological Reserve of Belarus and the Fukushima Exclusion Zone of Japan. We will study the Berlin Wall in present-day Germany and the former German Democratic Republic and the Korean Demilitarized Zone on the Korean Peninsula.
 
Broadly speaking, exclusion zones are territorial units, established by sanctioning bodies to manage activity (human, nonhuman, material, and otherwise) in a specific geographic area. This seminar will consider exclusion zones as charismatic landscapes. Like charismatic megafauna, these landscapes have been ascribed a symbolic value—as sites of so-called spontaneous or unplanned rewilding, of nationalistic endeavours, and of conservation to name a few—and in displaying some form of widespread appeal, are often leveraged by activists or other interested parties towards achieving environmentalist or conservatory—but always political—goals.
 
This seminar takes a transdisciplinary approach to landscape studies and will move between, across, and beyond the disciplines of architecture, art, biology, ecology, gardening, geography (physical and human), media studies, science and technology studies, and of course, landscape architecture itself. We will draw upon a diverse network of external guests—from activists, artists, designers, philosophers, researchers, scientists and theorists—who will join the course through conversations, sharing ways in which we can consider landscapes and landscape architecture and the entanglement of the human and the nonhuman within the frame of these charismatic landscapes.
 

  • ARC465H1F LEC9101: Advanced Topics in Architecture: Lazy Computing
    Instructor: Andrew Bako

If our current design software has enabled a transformative re-allocation of an architect’s labor, it has also resulted in a posture of disciplinary nonchalance. In this course, we will examine our commands, constraints and OS interactions, and their implications in contemporary digital practice.

Students will be asked to develop their digital skill sets through the production of architectural animations, and through unconventional usages of everyday computational platforms. Through a series of software exercises, students will explore the feedback between architectural form and its representation, and the shrinking gap between simulative abstraction and the physical realm.

  • ARC465H1F 1 LEC9102: Advanced Topics in Architecture: Guided Distractions 3.0 - Abstraction and Experimentation in Architecture
    Instructor: Reza Nik

This course aims to use experimental processes in various disciplines such as poetry, film, drawing and sculpture to address a currently charged socio-political issue within the city. These techniques will be explored through a series of parameter-based experiments with an emphasis on abstraction (and its varying levels), chance (and indeterminacy), and failure. Alternate materials and techniques will be explored in a workshop setting to look beyond the typical architectural toolbox. We will closely study and hear from a multidisciplinary team of current and past experimenters such as John Cage, Buckminster Fuller, Virgil Abloh, Harryette Mullen, Lebbeus Woods, Theaster Gates amongst other guest lecturers. The course will conclude with a group exhibition.

  • ARC466H1F LEC9101: Advanced Topics Landscape Architecture: Zones of Exclusion
    Instructor: Elise Hunchuck

This seminar explores the political dimension and potential of landscape architecture as a practice of design and maintenance through the recombinant strategies of research, documentation, and representation of zones of exclusion from throughout the twentieth and twenty-first century. This includes border zones, military exclusion zones, and nuclear disaster exclusion zones, among others, across the Americas, Asia, and Europe. We will examine case studies that include the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone of Ukraine, the Fukushima Exclusion Zone of Japan, the Berlin Wall of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR/DDR), and the Korean Demilitarized Zone on the Korean Peninsula.
 
Our inquiry is premised on the idea, as proposed by Ross Exo Adams in Landscapes of Post-History, [1] that landscapes function both as archives and historiographic texts. Considered on their own, these landscapes are hyper-localised, intimately tied to the materiality of their locations and the history of their making. In agglomeration, they speak to emergent planetary effects: they tell us about the material flows of our environments subject to different forces at different scales. To critically think how these landscapes become charismatic, that is, how they (only) become manifest (to humans) when they become anomalous, dangerous, or otherwise unusable, this seminar will take a transdisciplinary approach, moving between, across, and beyond the disciplines of architecture, art, biology, ecology, gardening, geography (physical and human), media studies, science and technology studies, and landscape architecture. Practically speaking, this will entail site-specific engagement through careful, rigorous and inquisitive documentation of landscapes that range from their materiality to the relationships found therein between resources, infrastructures, natural processes, and lives lived (human and nonhuman). In so doing, the framing of such charismatic landscapes as distinct political ecologies may serve to “deliberately outline an activism by which to achieve a certain outcome.” [2] It may also serve to further develop an understanding of landscapes and environmental design as ongoing projects in the immediate present, not limited to the aftermath of an emergency.
 
It is in this re-articulation of planetary relations and realities that we might visualise and develop new alliances, legal framework, or spatial strategies. For if, after all, as William Gibson so famously remarked “the future is already here, it’s just unevenly distributed,” [4] then it also stands to remind ourselves that there are multiple futures possible. It is up to us—as individuals and together—to determine how equitable and inclusive and caring they may be. 
 
1. “Landscapes of Post-History” can be found in Landscape and Agency: Critical Essays. Edited by Ed Wall and Tim Waterman (London: Routledge. 2017).
2. Ibid.
3. William Gibson in conversation on “The Science in Science Fiction” on Talk of the Nation, NPR (30 November 1999, at timecode 11:55).

  • ARC480H1F LEC9101: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Architecture: Re-integrating Design
    Instructor: Salmon Khalil Araghi

This seminar will examine the term integrated practice which has emerged over the past several years. Integration in the building industry is referred to a multidisciplinary approach in design and an outcome of collaboration in architecture, engineering and fabrication from the earliest stage of design. Inspired by nature, the emergence of complex form has brought a close collaboration, out of necessity. The binding agent of the professional integration is digital and information technologies that provide for seamless exchange of information from conception to construction. This course is about that which could be borrowed from elsewhere (i.e. from another disciplinary context) and potentially pursued as a promising trajectory in design. Through a series of lecture and workshop, students will be introduced the topic and asked to critically discuss selected articles. Students will be asked to research and develop a potentially ‘integrative’ proposal (approved by the instructor) of design prototypes that will be created and presented at the end.

  • ARC480H1F 1 LEC9102: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Architecture: Designing [with] Inherited Data
    Instructor: Maria Yablonina

The course will introduce students to computational design tools and methods that leverage externally generated and inherited data as design drivers.

The first part of the course will focus on computational skill building in Rhinoceros and Grasshopper, specifically the development of custom Grasshopper components using the programming language Python. In the second part of the course these skills will be applied to simulation and design exercises utilizing: agent-based and behavioral systems, and data collection from sensors and web sources.

Throughout the course technical skilling will be supplemented by critical discussions about the responsibilities of designing with collected or inherited data: What type of information can be used (or mis-used) as design parameter? Can we make sense of messy data through design of physical artifacts? Can a designed object carry or represent the information used to generate it? What are our responsibilities as designers when considering such objects?

The course will conclude with a final digitally designed and fabricated project coupled with a written narrative component which describes the story of the data underpinning the design.

  • ARC451H1S LEC0101: Advanced Topics in the History and Theory of Architecture: Architecture, Media, and World System
    Instructor: Mary Louise Lobsinger

In this seminar we will examine the infrastructures through which architecture and urbanism participate in the making of a global imaginary. The projection of a world system precedes contemporary terms such as ‘the global,’ ‘globalization,’ or ‘globalism.’ In the nineteenth century the idea of world system was pursued through techniques and technological inventions that aligned with and facilitated imperialist aspirations in pursuit of land, peoples, and resource extraction. These techniques and technologies have material and conceptual properties and consequences. These provided the underpinnings, they enabled the infrastructural, from institutions and national roadway systems to the legal means, the exportation of pedagogy, and the making of objects and subjects.

The seminar will draw upon various methods of inquiry including media theory, cultural techniques analysis, and readings from philosophy, on globalism, and political economy. From this grounding we will engage a perspective that considers architecture as medium specific and in relation to many media. The approach questions those histories and theories that limit architecture to formal attributes and disciplinary preoccupations with representational value and status. It seeks to engage the overlooked, that is, the ways in which architecture participates within a complex dynamic that materializes financial capitalism and has produced spatial inequities, colonization, the enslaved, and racism. The seminar will look at specific cases. For example, the university and education (the British or American systems of expansion), the library and the book, bureaucracy and corporations (the Hudson Bay Company etc.), the development agency and funding, and housing and gentrification as infrastructures of imperialism.

Interested students should be willing to contribute to the interactive components of the class, be willing to work collaboratively on-line, engage with the readings, and lead one of weekly discussions of an assigned reading. Students will pursue a term project. The seminar will have synchronous and asynchronous components.

  • ARC451H1S 1 LEC0102: Advanced Topics in the History and Theory of Architecture: “The Only Two Arts of Our Time": Film and Architecture 1877-Present
    Instructor: James MacGillivray

In the latter half of the 19th century new building technologies were separating a concept called “space” from its trappings in tectonics. At the same time, the medium of photography was combined with the successive instants of the Gatling gun, liberating it from stasis and creating a new kind of pictorial space called “cinema”. The deep kinship of these two arts--Le Corbusier called them “the only two arts of our time”-- is the topic of this lecture course. We will look at what these two art forms have meant to each other for the past hundred years and how each has managed to challenge, usurp or exploit the other. Students will be expected to read theoretical texts, watch difficult and hard to see films every week, and prepare remarks on source materials for each class. The course will consider work by: Marie Menken, Michael Snow, Takeshi Murata, Andrei Tarkovsky, Sergei Eisenstein, Carl Th. Dreyer, Dziga Vertov, Maya Deren, Oskar Fischinger, Howard Hawks, Michelangelo Antonioni, Steven Holl, Diller Scofidio Renfro, Bernard Tschumi, Hans Poelzig, Le Corbusier, and Edweard Muybridge among others.

  • ARC452H1S LEC0101: Advanced Topics in the History and Theory of Landscape Architecture: "Hewes of wood, drawers of water": Designing Canadian Energy Futures
    Instructor: Douglas Robb

Harold Innis famously claimed that Canadians are mere “hewers of wood and drawers of water”; in other words, that Canada is a nation of abundant natural resources ripe for the taking. We now recognize how Innis’ simplistic remark obscures important debates about the role of energy resources in Canada. Current discourses on decarbonization, climate justice, and Indigneous sovereignty (among others) reveal the complex and contradictory perspectives that characterize Canadian energy landscapes. While some argue for the continued extraction of hydrocarbons as a pragmatic "bridge" to a low-carbon future, others advocate for a more rapid (and radical) socio-technical transition. Myriad pathways exist in between, all of which present unique uncertainties and risks. These debates typically unfold in abstract institutional settings or at the local community level. However, their political, economic, and environmental implications resonate across the country and throughout the global energy system.

This course engages contemporary debates on the future of energy in Canada through the lens of landscape architecture. Organized around the structure of a formal debate—affirmative, negative, and rebuttal—the course will explore historical processes of landscape transformation related to the pursuit of energy resources, and will challenge students to analyze and envision potential energy futures through the medium of design.

  • ARC453H1S LEC0101: Advanced Topics in the History and Theory of Urbanism: Heavy Intangibles: The Geological Materiality of Planetary Computing
    Instructor: Kearon Roy-Taylor

The myth of dematerializing infrastructure and the post-industrial economy hides an essentially colonial truth: we are industrializing at a faster rate than ever before.

Planetary-scale computing relies on a heavy, energy- and resource-hungry globe-spanning physical apparatus, from subsea cables and server farms to the lithium and rare earth mines in the Global South that furnish them. Beginning with a historical perspective on the development of communication networks, Heavy Intangibles will trace the nature and ecology of the contemporary spaces and infrastructural-logistical systems that comprise what Benjamin H. Bratton terms the accidental megastructure.

While Marshall McLuhan saw media as “extensions of man,” Heavy Intangibles addresses the materiality of technology as Robert Smithson describes, “made from the raw materials of the earth.” Students will be tasked through case studies to develop a critical language to address the physical, ecological, and geological footprint of “the post-industrial.”

  • ARC453H1S 1 LEC0102: Advanced Topics in the History and Theory of Urbanism: Informal Urbanisms
    Instructor: Tara Bissett

The world is urbanizing at an unprecedented pace and in unexpected ways. By 2030, five billion people will be living in urban areas that increasingly defy our ideas of ‘city’ and ‘citizenship’ as has been historically defined. The objective of the course is to reconsider global urbanism through a selection of readings in grounded theory and to analyze selected global cities—Johannesburg, Medellin, Mumbai, Cairo, Calais, Darfur, Casablanca, and others—that have formed uniquely in relation to phenomena such as shifts in global real estate markets, crises in war, decolonization, the rise of informal economies, and that have developed microcities and migrant enclaves. Students will be asked to reflect critically on participatory frameworks in design processes, incremental building practices, and kinetic urbanism through collaborative assignments with other students and the instructor. Please note that this course is the same as previous years "ARC 453: Exile and the Modern City.”

  • ARC465H1S LEC0101: Advanced Topics in Architecture: Reality and its Representation
    Instructor: Adrian Phiffer

It is obvious that if one is to consider the problem of “red pill / blue pill” in architectural representation, the architect has decided to swallow the “blue pill”. Nowadays, most of the architectural imagery is soaked in a blossoming happiness with nauseating effects and always overly controlled and precise to the point of acquiring non-humanistic tones. And despite the high level of legibility, what you see is not what you get. The result is hard on the edge but slimy on the inside. It can be grasped, but when confronted or squeezed it slips away.

This advanced seminar in architecture will start from the premise that representation may produce rather than repeat reality. Via thorough analysis of past and present modes of architectural representation, we will engage in speculations about a future reality shaped by responsibility, acceptance, and inclusion.

While the main structure of the class is lecture based, we will often operate in a design studio mode through open and collective critiques. The students will be asked to constantly draw, model, and write. A minimum knowledge in computer graphics and model construction is required. Finally, the objective of this seminar is to enable the students to think very clearly about architectural representation in particular, and the world in general, while building up advanced skills in image making.

  • ARC465H1S 1 LEC0102: Advanced Topics in Architecture: The rise, fall and future of 1960’s megastructures: reimagining Ontario Place
    Instructor: Aziza Chaouni

The 1960’s saw the emergence of the megastructure typology, which refers to a range of futurist proposals and experiments in architecture and urban design. Introduced by Reyner Banham’s seminal 1976 book "Megastructure: Urban Futures of the Recent Past”, the term megastructure usually refers to a single building or structure acting as an expandable frame that can hosts architecture, infrastructure, landscape and utilities, thereby creating its own, self-contained ‘city’. The 1960’s megastructures of Yona Friedman, Cedric J. Price and Archigram attempted to address issues of overpopulation, densification and technology.

During the 1970s, the design of megastructures was influenced by both the environmental and American ‘counter culture’ movements, and shifted to projects more integrated with nature, such as floating habitats. Examples of this later phase include Buckminster Fuller’s Triton City, Kenzo Tange’s Tokyo Bay Project, Kikutake’s Ocean City, Frei Otto’s Artic City and Ontario Place.

This advanced seminar will introduce students to the megastructure movement, its emergence and evolution, then focus on the few built megastructures projects such as Jean Prouvé’s Free University of Berlin, Soleri’s Arpsanti, Georges Candilis’ Le Mirail in Toulouse, Zevaco’s Sidi Harazem Thermal Bath, the Helicoide in Caracas, and closer to home, Montreal expo 67, Massey’s Simon Fraser and Ontario Place. The course will reflect not only on the relevance and values that these megastructures hold today, but also on their challenging relationship to aging technology, users’ needs, public opinion and conservation groups and activists.

In addition, through semester long self-guided drawing experimentations and onsite immersion, the course will use Ontario Place - designed in 1971 by Eb Zeidler and Michael Hough on 3 artificial islands along the Toronto waterfront and is today under threat of being demolished- as a case study to reveal a megastructure’s potential to adapt to new political, environmental and socio-economic requirements.

  • ARC465H1S A LEC0103: Advanced Topics in Architecture: Between the Lines: Borders, Territory and Space
    Instructor: Anne-Marie Armstrong

This course focuses on urbanism and architecture’s relationship with borders as political, ecological, and topological conditions. As key instruments in defining the logistics of space and territory, borders operate at multiple scales from the local to the global, and from the constructed to the imaginary. Students will explore how borders reinforce inclusion and exclusion in urbanism, and how designers can engage with, and transform, border conditions as they navigate on the edge, margins and thresholds in-between

  • ARC467H1S LEC5101: Advanced Topics in Urban Design: Sustain and Support: In The Military Orbit
    Instructor: Miles Gertler

This seminar examines accidental and under-acknowledged urbanisms of the US military and establishes a journalistic research methodology to unpack transurban phenomena and the extra-architectural in preparation for design intervention and discursive analysis. Week by week, this course encourages students to apply architectural tools toward the production of a rigorous account of radical contemporary episodes from daily life within the expanded orbit of the United States’ military. Working through complex drawings and digital models, and ultimately the production of a comprehensive report, students will trace an avatar’s operations as it engages users, objects, energies, situations, and the administrative super-strata that manage its existence. The course demands that students cast a wide net, accounting for a rigorous and expanded picture of the urban and infrastructural consequences of transnational military activity. In each situation, students will be required to produce a detail-oriented account of their episode and avatar as it participates in and establishes remote urbanisms across sites and in virtual and material domains.

  • ARC480H1S LEC5101: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Architecture: Drawing Out Urban Interfaces
    Instructor: Simon Rabyniuk

Interfaces are thresholds that bind people together with a commonwealth of machines. They are also channels that augment the human sensorium –opening new visits. Additionally, they are zones of activity that bound a user’s experience. As such, users act through them in shaping the world, and in turn are also acted on by them. With the ascendance of network-culture, the interface –a user’s site of contact with networks– joins older forms of media (e.g. streets, pipes, powerlines, etc.) as an infrastructure through which society organizes itself. However, surely the role of private enterprise in refining the present-moments most commonly used interfaces cannot be overlooked here.

This course investigates the urbanism of mediation. It explores critical frameworks and skillsets relevant for students engaging questions about design practice, technology and the city. For the first half of the semester students will develop a typology of urban interfaces in which they will represent relationships between users, machines and the spaces in which both transit. Through this activity students will develop an analytic relationship with interfaces excavated from everyday life, media art, architecture and speculative design. Towards bridging theory and practice, during the second half of the semester, students will develop collaborative proposals and prototypes that engage issues pertaining to the use of open data, physical computing, data visualization and digital fabrication.

  • ARC482H1S LEC0101: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Urbanism: Thermal Resilience in Building Design
    Instructor: Bomani Khemet

The objective of the course is to develop an advanced understanding of the link between building enclosure systems, environmental systems, and low energy building designs, and approaches. Specific objectives are to:

  1. Explore typical and high performing wall designs through a series of discussions, debates, and workshops.
  2. Explore how uncontrolled heat flow, air flow and, moisture flow through the building enclosure affects sustainability and design.
  3. Explore the bond between architectural design and select sustainability inspired building code changes.
  4. Examine integration of environmental systems with buildings at the local and district scale through a series of site visits and discussion with experts.

Summer 2020 Course Descriptions

ARC 200-Level Close Readings

The Close Readings courses listed below involve detailed examination of case studies in the history of architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design with close attention to the objects of study. The relationship between design, context, and theory will be explored through analyses of artifacts and texts.

ARC 400-Level Advanced Topics

The Advanced Topics courses listed below are distinct credit offerings, and eligible students can enrol in more than one of the following courses, despite repeating course codes. For example, students can complete in ARC451H1F LEC0101 and ARC451H1S LEC9101, as their course content will differ depending on the instructor. Please note that a section number LEC9101 denotes an online course offering.

  • ARC451H1F LEC9101: Advanced Topics in History and Theory of Architecture:
    Written Out of History; Architecture in Europe Since 1945

This lecture course revisits European architecture by focussing at what is standing in the shadow of the continent’s greatest hits, from the welfare state architecture of Friis og Moltke in Jutland (Denmark) to the infrastructural work of Rino Tami in the canton of Ticino (Switzerland); from the middle-class housing of Monaco e Luccichenti in Rome to the social housing of Jadwiga Grabowska-Hawrylak in Wrocław (Poland); and from the light-hearted postwar reconstruction of the seaside resort of Royan (France) to the uptight classicism of Cäsar Pinnau in Germany.

The ambition of global history to encompass a culturally and geographically broader territory than just the same set of Western people, projects and perspectives that surface in every book, will be applied here to European architecture itself. The course will focus on the wealth of postwar European architecture which is only mentioned in passing, relegated to the footnotes, or almost completely ignored.

The course not only discusses overlooked aspects of the architectural culture of Europe, but also offers insights why certain architecture is ignored while other undervalued architecture has made a comeback. By doing that, it addresses mechanisms behind the writing of architectural history.

  • ARC465H1F LEC9101: Advanced Topics in Architecture:
    Reality and its Representation

It is obvious that if one is to consider the problem of “red pill / blue pill” in architectural representation, the architect has decided to swallow the “blue pill”. Nowadays, most of the architectural imagery is soaked in a blossoming happiness with nauseating effects and always overly controlled and precise to the point of acquiring non-humanistic tones. And despite the high level of legibility, what you see is not what you get. The result is hard on the edge but slimy on the inside. It can be grasped, but when confronted or squeezed it slips away.

This advanced seminar in architecture will start from the premise that representation may produce rather than repeat reality. Via thorough analysis of past and present modes of architectural representation, we will engage in speculations about a future reality shaped by responsibility, acceptance, and inclusion.

While the main structure of the class is lecture based, we will often operate in a design studio mode through open and collective critiques. The students will be asked to constantly draw, model, and write. A minimum knowledge in computer graphics and model construction is required. Finally, the objective of this seminar is to enable the students to think very clearly about architectural representation in particular, and the world in general, while building up advanced skills in image making.

  • ARC467H1F LEC9101: Advanced Topics in Urban Design:
    Sustain & Support; Urbanism in Military Orbit

A close interrogation of the U.S. military's architectural and infrastructural arsenal reveals that the military-industrial complex is alive and well and increasingly intertwined with the technological strata of daily civilian life. This seminar examines clandestine, accidental, and under-acknowledged urbanisms sponsored by the Department of Defense and establishes a journalistic research methodology to analyze the spatial and logistical operations of statecraft. Through the gradual development of a comprehensive report, students will produce drawings and texts to articulate, visualize, and critique a world which is so often made opaque by design. Working in pairs, students will develop a body of research around a single episode chosen from the recent history of the military and adopt an avatar to focus their inquiry for the duration of the semester.

  • ARC480H1S LEC9101: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Architecture:
    Lazy Computing

If our current design software has enabled a transformative re-allocation of an architect’s labor, it has also resulted in a posture of disciplinary nonchalance. In this course, we will examine our commands, constraints and OS interactions, and their implications in contemporary digital practice.

Students will be asked to develop their digital skill sets through the production of architectural animations, and through unconventional usages of everyday computational platforms. Through a series of software exercises, students will explore the feedback between architectural form and its representation, and the shrinking gap between simulative abstraction and the physical realm.

  • ARC482H1S LEC9101: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Urbanism:
    Drawing Our Urban Interfaces

Interfaces are thresholds that bind people together with a commonwealth of machines. They are also channels that augment the human sensorium –opening new visits. Additionally, they are zones of activity that bound a user’s experience. As such, users act through them in shaping the world, and in turn are also acted on by them. With the ascendance of network-culture, the interface –a user’s site of contact with networks– joins older forms of media (e.g. streets, pipes, powerlines, etc.) as an infrastructure through which society organizes itself. However, surely the role of private enterprise in refining the present-moments most commonly used interfaces cannot be overlooked here.

This course investigates the urbanism of mediation. It explores critical frameworks and skillsets relevant for students engaging questions about design practice, technology and the city. For the first half of the semester students will develop a typology of urban interfaces in which they will represent relationships between users, machines and the spaces in which both transit. Through this activity students will develop an analytic relationship with interfaces excavated from everyday life, media art, architecture and speculative design. Towards bridging theory and practice, during the second half of the semester, students will develop collaborative proposals and prototypes that engage issues pertaining to the use of open data, physical computing, data visualization and digital fabrication.

Summer Studio Abroad

Please note that due to the COVID-19 situation, the following Daniels Summer Abroad courses have been cancelled for the Summer 2020 session.

Design/Build Studios

Please note that due to the COVID-19 situation, the following Daniels Design/Build Studio courses have been cancelled for the Summer 2020 session.

  • ARC395H1F PRA0101: Haliburton Forest / Timber Pavilion / May 11-22. Instructor: Jay Pooley
  • ARC395H1F PRA0102: Bentway / Playing in Public / May 4-15. Instructor: Clint Langevin
  • ARC395H1F PRA0103: Toronto / Mobilizer / June 1-12. Instructor: Reza Nik
  • ARC395H1S PRA0101: PEC / Coastal Community / July 6-19. Instructor(s): Mark Erikson and Matt Kennedy Studio North
  • ARC395Y1S PRA0101: Fogo Island / Building Community / June 1-12 and August 3-14. Instructor: Todd Saunders

Design Research Internship

Please note that due to the COVID-19 situation, the following Daniels Design Research Internship opportunity has been cancelled for the Summer 2020 session.

  • ARC495Y1: Design Research Internship / May 4 – June 12. Instructor: Pina Petricone

Past Course Descriptions

The following are the archived course descriptions from previous terms for unique course offerings outside of the regular sessional timetable.