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Course Descriptions & Timetables

Course timetables list the current course offerings for a given term and their enrolment controls. For Daniels Faculty course descriptions, prerequisites, exclusions, and breadth requirements, please see the Daniels Faculty Academic Calendar.

Please note that not all courses listed in the academic calendar are offered every year. Several unique Daniels Faculty course descriptions can be found below, including Design/Build studios, Summer Abroad studios, and Advanced Topics courses.

For Arts & Science course descriptions, prerequisites, exclusions, and breadth requirements, please see the Faculty of Arts & Science 2021-22 Timetable

Timetables

Current Timetables*

Archived Timetables

*If course offering or scheduling information on ACORN and the Timetable do not match, this Timetable will reflect the most updated course offering information. Contact registrar@daniels.utoronto.ca if you have any questions..

How to Read a Timetable

The Academic Timetable provides course meeting information (day, time, location, enrolment conditions) for the current Fall/Winter and Summer sessions. The Daniels Faculty undergraduate timetable includes all undergraduate Architectural Studies [ARC], Visual Studies [VIS], and Joint Architectural Studies and Visual Studies courses [JAV].

ARC, VIS, and JAV course descriptions, including prerequisites, and Architectural Studies and Visual Studies program requirements are listed in the Daniels Faculty Undergraduate Academic Calendar. 

The primary meeting section of Daniels undergraduate courses may either be an L (LEC; Lecture) or P (PRA; Practical) meeting section. Waitlists are only available for a course’s primary meeting section.

The Lecture is the primary meeting section for all courses with a Lecture only or a Lecture and a Tutorial (T; TUT). If there is more than one Lecture section listed, select the one that is offered at the time most convenient for your schedule. If the course has both Lecture and Tutorial sections, you must enrol in one of each.

The Practical is the primary meeting section for all courses with a Practical only or a Practical and a Lecture, with the exception of ARC302H1.* If there is more than one Practical section listed, select the one that is offered at the time most convenient for your schedule. If the course has both Practical and Lecture sections, you must enrol in one of each.

*The primary meeting section for ARC302H1 is the Lecture. You must enrol in both the Lecture and the Practical.

Time
M=Monday; T=Tuesday; W=Wednesday; R=Thursday; F=Friday; S=Saturday

Note: Classes begin at 10 minutes after the hour and finish on the hour unless otherwise stated.

Section Code
F = first or fall term (September to December)
S = second or winter/spring term (January to April)
Y = fall and winter/spring sessions (September to April)

Enrolment Indicator
Enrolment indicators identify how enrolment controls are being used and/or alert you to different enrolment processes.

Enrolment Indicator If you meet the Enrolment Control listed on the Timetable If you do not meet the Enrolment Control Special Notes
          P

You have priority to enrol on ACORN from your enrolment start date. Once priority enrolment closes, spaces will be made available to all students.

You may enrol on ACORN once priority enrolment closes.

 
          R

You may enrol on ACORN beginning on your enrolment start date at your start time.

This course is restricted and you may not enrol if you do not meet the enrolment control.

 
          E

Enrolment is done at the Department (not on ACORN). Refer to the departmental enrolment instructions on the Timetable listings.

This course is restricted and you may not enrol if you do not meet the enrolment control.

To cancel an E course, go to the Department or your Registrar's office prior to the stated drop deadline.

Room Codes
The building code refers to the campus map and are those used in the Timetable and course listings.

Download the UofT Map App to find classroom locations or view the building list at:
http://map.utoronto.ca/c/getApp        
http://map.utoronto.ca/c/buildings

Exclusions

Students may not enrol in a course that lists as an exclusion a course they are currently taking, a course they have already passed, or a course for which they have been given transfer credit. If they enrol in such a course, they may be removed at any time during the enrolment period or during the session. Additional details can be reviewed in the Academic Calendar.

Students may request to take the course as an EXT after the priority period, if there is space.This can be done by emailing registrar@daniels.utoronto.ca after the priority period.

Fall/Winter 2021-22 Course Descriptions

ARC 400-Level Advanced Topics

The Advanced Topics courses listed below are distinct credit offerings, and eligible students can enrol in more than one of the following courses, despite repeating course codes. For example, students can complete in ARC451H1F LEC0101 and ARC451H1S LEC9101, as their course content will differ depending on the instructor. Please note that a section number LEC9101 denotes an online course offering.

The Fall/Winter 2021-22 ARC 400-level Advanced Topics Balloting webform can be found here. The deadline for eligible Year 4 students to submit is Thursday, July 8th, 2021 at 8:00am EST.

  • ARC451H1F LEC0101: Advanced Topics in the History and Theory of Architecture: Mobility and Architecture
    Instructor: Ipek Mehmetoglu

This seminar aims to expand our understanding of the role of mobility in architectural history, education, knowledge, theory, and culture throughout the twentieth century. We will explore how architects have built, traveled to, or recorded in different landscapes, how mobility has affected the tools, vehicles, and machines that architects have engaged, and how mobility has shaped the spatial encounters and architectural perceptions of communities and individuals around the world. The course offers an opportunity to revisit the ways in which personal and professional identities have been negotiated on the move. To do this, we will turn to marginalized and in-between forms and spaces through which architects as well as users have altered architectural knowledge. We will develop the necessary skills to analyze historical material within a methodological framework and make use of interdisciplinary and intersectional approaches in uncovering new meanings of architectural production, appropriation, and representation using the concept of movement. Students are expected to complete the weekly readings prior to meetings and to participate in class discussions.

  • ARC451H1F 1 LEC0102: Advanced Topics in History and Theory of Architecture: Architecture and Extractive Landscapes: Ecologies and Empires
    Instructor: Jason Nguyen

The quest for natural resources like gold, silver, sugar, spices, coffee, furs, and fish motivated the expansion of European trade and empire from the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. During this period, merchants and settlers exploited resource-rich lands and seas through mining, farming, hunting, fishing, and trade. This seminar looks at the buildings, infrastructure, and planned landscapes that facilitated the extraction of resources from the earth for imperial purposes. The aim is to consider how architectural forms and technologies brought theories of the natural world into dialogue with the politics and practices of empire (among other things, these included settler colonialism, which involved the forced removal and genocide of Indigenous people and the importation and subjugation of enslaved labourers). We begin by considering different philosophies of the natural world as they concerned the cultivation and stewardship of the lands and seas (from both western and non-western perspectives). We will then interrogate the architectural forms, landscape ecologies, and labour operations of different extractive settings, including mines, plantations, gardens, hunting grounds, harvestable forests, and fisheries. We conclude by assessing the legacies of extractivism and empire for architecture and landscape today, including their connections to the current environmental crisis and enduring systems of geopolitical and racial inequality. Readings, discussions, and writing exercises will lead to a final project of each student’s choosing.

  • ARC453H1F LEC0101: Advanced Topics in the History and Theory of Urbanism: THE DEEP TIME OF MEDIA: The Geological Materiality of Planetary Computing
    Instructor: Kearon Roy Taylor

The myth of dematerializing infrastructure and the post-industrial economy hides an essentially colonial truth: we are industrializing at a faster rate than ever before.

Planetary-scale computing relies on a heavy, energy- and resource-hungry globe-spanning physical apparatus, from subsea cables and server farms to the lithium and rare earth mines in the Global South that furnish them. Beginning with a historical perspective on the development of communication networks,The Deep Time of Media will trace the nature and ecology of the contemporary spaces and infrastructural-logistical systems that comprise what Benjamin H. Bratton terms the accidental megastructure.

While Marshall McLuhan saw media as “extensions of man,” The Deep Time of Media addresses the materiality of technology as Robert Smithson describes, “made from the raw materials of the earth.” Students will be tasked through case studies to develop a critical language to address the physical, ecological, and geological footprint of “the post-industrial.”

  • ARC465H1F LEC0101: Advanced Topics in Architecture: Digital Twinning
    Instructor: Jay Pooley

In autumn of 2020 as the Biennale Architecttura would have been coming to a close, if not for the global pandemic that became the leading antagonist of the year, a different piece of architectural news was leveraged from the beloved Venetian Lagoon. A team of researchers, scientists and architects had recently completed a high resolution digital scan comprising the entirety of San Giorgio. A means to preserving the compromised archipelago and a demonstration of methods to create a digital twin of architecture in peril.

Through a series of compounding exercises, Digital Twinning will study point cloud, LiDAR and photogrammetry scanning practices as seen through a mixture of theoretical study, physical application and experiential field work. Students will engage with industry experts in the development of a photogrammetry-based digital model of a an elusive and serpentine site from a selection of decommissioned provincial industrial spaces. The model will underpin the semester, acting as both co-conspirator and interrogator in the process of designing with a digital twin.

  • ARC480H1F 1 LEC0102: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Architecture: Designing [with] Machines
    Instructor: Maria Yablonina

In this class we will be developing skills in computational design and physical computing through building digital and physical machines that respond, interact, and occasionally misbehave. Specifically, we will be looking into techniques and methodologies for creating computational and robotic systems that can simulate properties of living organisms: behaviours, stimuli responses, self-organisation, and even learning.

Throughout the course technical skilling will be supplemented with discussions and reading assignments focusing on the critical aspects of computational design and robotics in architecture, art, and culture. By the end of the course the students will be expected to develop a project that responds or reacts to one of the issues raised in the reading assignments using the technical skills they will develop throughout the course.

The first seven weeks of the course will focus on computational skill building in Rhino, Grasshopper, Python, and Arduino, through a series of smaller technical exercises and assignments. We will specifically be looking into sensor data collection and processing, data scraping, agent-based computational systems, and basic machine learning. Technical tutorials will be accompanied by lectures delivered by instructor and guest speakers. In the second part of the course the students will focus on the development of their individual projects. During this project phase additional tutorials and technical expertise will be introduced based on the project requirements.

Previous experience with Grasshopper and Arduino is preferable but not required. It is highly recommended that students interested in this course take the ARC385 (Physical Computing) class first as a prerequisite.

  • ARC480H1F LEC0101: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Architecture: Building Envelopes: Systems, Responses, and Affect
    Instructor: Daniel Chung

This seminar will explore the past, present, and future of building envelopes as technological and societal responses to our environmental desires. Building enclosures are often multilayered systems designed to respond and adapt to external forces and occupant needs. They are also designed to communicate spatial affect that extends beyond the basic needs of shelter and climate protection. This course will examine past and existing envelope designs to understand how the technical systems that were employed were a response to their climate, context, and cultural conditions. After developing a methodology for parsing and analyzing existing enclosure designs, the course will then project how future envelope designs will address new challenges and aspirations.

This course will combine analytical evaluations of building envelopes (structure, heat, air, moisture, lighting) and critical reflections on how envelopes respond to social and cultural forces through readings, assignments, presentations, and discussions. Student should expect to perform technical analysis, critical discussions, and speculative design exercises.

  • ARC451H1S LEC0101: Advanced Topics in History and Theory of Architecture: Architecture, Media, Local and Global Imaginaries
    Instructor: Mary Louise Lobsinger

We inhabit a local within global imaginaries, this has been our lived experience, confronted, intimately, since March 2020. This class examines the ways that architecture and the varied scales of infrastructures participate in making global imageries. We will engage methods of inquiry that enable thinking about architecture as a medium; this approach asks us to think built forms through material processes. It shifts our focus from formal aesthetic attributes to consider the infrastructural dynamic within which architecture participates and challenges received histories of modernism to track technical, social, political, and material techniques that enable global imaginaries. If the 19th century saw the idea of world system pursued through inventions, institutions and corporate entities, timetables, treaties, and territorial organization, we now experience the geopolitics of, for example, education, materials such as concrete, labour to “belt and road” initiatives that, then as now, align with imperialist aspirations to settlement and empire. The course draws on varied scales and types of evidence, from built and unbuilt architecture, types such as the library, technical advances, to the exportation of planning across the globe. We will be particularly attentive to questions of land, settlement, and bodies; to the techniques and infrastructures that underpin resource and labour extraction, racialization and the making of the modern self-possessed subject within a global imaginary. The course seeks to engage the overlooked, the ways in which built form participates in a complex dynamic that materializes financial capitalism and has produced spatial inequalities, colonization, the enslaved and racism. Each week will focus on a central question, a lecture and a student group led discussion of required course materials. The deliverables include scaffolded short assignments that will assist an enthusiastically pursued final project. NOTE: this course is similar to ARC_451_Winter 2021. The course includes new materials on the ethics of care, petroleum and territorial planning in Canada, and the local within the global.

  • ARC465H1S LEC0101: Advanced Topics in Architecture: Reality and its Representation
    Instructor: Adrian Phiffer

It is obvious that if one is to consider the problem of “red pill / blue pill” in architectural representation, the architect has decided to swallow the “blue pill”. Nowadays, most of the architectural imagery is soaked in a blossoming happiness with nauseating effects and always overly controlled and precise to the point of acquiring non-humanistic tones. And despite the high level of legibility, what you see is not what you get. The result is hard on the edge but slimy on the inside. It can be grasped, but when confronted or squeezed it slips away.

This advanced seminar in architecture will start from the premise that representation may produce rather than repeat reality. Via thorough analysis of past and present modes of architectural representation, we will engage in speculations about a future reality shaped by responsibility, acceptance, and inclusion.

While the main structure of the class is lecture based, we will often operate in a design studio mode through open and collective critiques. The students will be asked to constantly draw, model, and write. A minimum knowledge in computer graphics and model construction is required. Finally, the objective of this seminar is to enable the students to think very clearly about architectural representation in particular, and the world in general, while building up advanced skills in image making.

  • ARC465H1S 1 LEC0102: Advanced Topics in Architecture: Guided Distractions 4.0 - Abstraction and Experimentation in Architecture
    Instructor: Reza Nik

Guided Distractions 4.0 is focused on alternate design processes while addressing socio-political and spatial injustices in the urban setting. Each iteration explores a specific theme and students are encouraged to distract themselves creatively while involved in deep research. GD4.0 will closely study past and present experimenters such as Virgil Abloh, John Cage, Harryette Mullen, Lebbeus Woods and many others, We will learn about their particular experimental processes for example the zig-zag approach, chance and indeterminacy and the importance of failure. The course is fast-paced with an emphasis on how to fine-tune your creative process. Students are constantly encouraged to abandon their comfort zones in order to tap into their unconscious creative-selves. Alternate materials and techniques will be explored in a studio setting to look beyond the typical architectural toolbox. The course will terminate with a group exhibition at a gallery space in downtown Toronto.

  • ARC465H1S 1 LEC0103: Advanced Topics in Architecture: Casting
    Instructor: An Te Liu

This course involves the design, prototyping, and fabrication of functional objects at the most intimate scales of architectural experience - that of the body and the hand. In this workshop and fabrication-based course students will explore a wide variety of media and techniques in the design and making of objects for everyday use. The course will begin with the development, either manually or digitally, of prototypes (the positive or “original”), then move to mold-making (the negative form of the original), and then final realization through the casting of another material using the mold. Iterative experimentation with different media and workflows are encouraged in the pursuit of a final product with highly specific material, aesthetic and functional properties. Coursework can be completed using materials and tools commonly available at art supply and hardware stores, such as polystyrene foam, plaster, and concrete. Students may also opt to develop their projects in ceramic, cast aluminum, or bronze. Detailed workshops will be conducted to familiarize students with a broad array of mold-making methods and casting and finishing techniques.

  • ARC467H1S LEC0101: Advanced Topics in Urban Design: Sustain and Support: In The Military Orbit
    Instructor: Miles Gertler

This seminar examines accidental, clandestine, and under-acknowledged urbanisms and environments of the US military and establishes a journalistic research method to unpack the situation and the extra-architectural for discursive analysis. Week by week, this course encourages students to apply architectural tools toward the production of a rigorous, documentary account of radical, contemporary episodes from daily life within the expanded orbit of the United States’ military. Working through drawing, digital models, and the production of a comprehensive visual report, students will trace an avatar’s operations and advance findings on the nature of city- and infrastructure-building in the military context.

  • ARC480H1S LEC0101: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Architecture: Re-integrating Design 1
    Instructor: Salman Khalili-Araghi

This seminar will examine the term integrated practice which has emerged over the past several years. Integration in the building industry is referred to a multidisciplinary approach in design and an outcome of collaboration in architecture, engineering and fabrication from the earliest stage of design. Inspired by nature, the emergence of complex form has brought a close collaboration, out of necessity. The binding agent of the professional integration is digital and information technologies that provide for seamless exchange of information from conception to construction. This course is about that which could be borrowed from elsewhere (i.e. from another disciplinary context) and potentially pursued as a promising trajectory in design. Through a series of lecture and workshop, students will be introduced the topic and asked to critically discuss selected articles. Students will be asked to research and develop a potentially ‘integrative’ proposal (approved by the instructor) of design prototypes that will be created and presented at the end.

  • ARC480H1S 1 LEC0102: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Urbanism: Lazy Computing
    Instructor: Andy Bako

If our current design software has enabled a transformative re-allocation of an architect’s labor, it has also resulted in a posture of disciplinary nonchalance. In this course, we will examine our commands, constraints and OS interactions, and their implications in contemporary digital practice.

Students will be asked to develop their digital skill sets through the production of architectural animations, and through unconventional usages of everyday computational platforms. Through a series of software exercises, students will explore the feedback between architectural form and its representation, and the shrinking gap between simulative abstraction and the physical realm.

Summer 2021 Course Descriptions

Design Research Internship

  • ARC399H1F LEC9101: Research Opportunity Program:
    Design Research Internship

This course bridges academic knowledge with professional practice and advances for upper level, undergraduate students models of design research. It offers students, in the form of an intensive, on-line internship, the opportunity to apply critical research and visual communication skills to focused, development phases of Giannone Petricone Architects’ professional projects. Successful students will participate in group and individual work that collectively contributes to a compendium for exhibition that traces various custom light fixtures, built and under construction for a range of the firm’s projects. The work will begin with a review and analyses of the collection through drawings, shop drawings and construction photos, alongside an accelerated design project for the graphic representation of the final ’atlas’. Students will be guided by presentations of models for design research and its systems of representation as well as individual and group feedback.

Course Dates

  • The course will be delivered synchronously May 31st - June 14th from 9am – 5pm, Monday to Friday.
  • Students who are admitted to this course will automatically be considered for an extended internship from May 31st - July 12th via the Work-Study program, pending approval.

Application Requirements

  • Applicants must submit a CV and a cover letter.
  • Applications should be emailed to ugdirector@daniels.utoronto.ca with the subject ‘ARC399H1 Design Research Internship: LASTNAME, STUDENT NUMBER’ as early as possible and no later than Monday, April 12, 2021.
  • Results: Successful students will be enrolled into ARC399H1F: Design Research Internship by end of day Monday, April 26, 2021.

ARC 400-Level Advanced Topics

The Advanced Topics courses listed below are distinct credit offerings, and eligible students can enrol in more than one of the following courses, despite repeating course codes. For example, students can complete in ARC451H1F LEC0101 and ARC451H1S LEC9101, as their course content will differ depending on the instructor. Please note that a section number LEC9101 denotes an online course offering.

None of our Summer 2021 ARC 400-level Advanced Topics courses are eligible for satisfaction of AHCERGLOB or AHCERSUSP certificate program requirements.

  • ARC451H1F LEC9101: Advanced Topics in History and Theory of Architecture:
    Earth, Air, Water, Fire: Architectural Matter

Materials are the transformation of matter into useable form, and this seminar will look at the four principal elements as the basis for all architectural making and experience. We will spend two classes on each of these elements, reading philosophy, literature and historical writing as well as looking at the traditions of architectural practice. Course material will include the full range of historic buildings as a way for students to develop their own approach to studying architecture. Gaston Bachelard’s writing on the elements will form our core text, and students will be encouraged to study the architecture they have close at hand in order to put his approach and theories into practice. Frequent short writing assignments and classroom discussion will lead to a final project based around each student’s interests

  • ARC465H1F LEC9101: Advanced Topics in Architecture:
    Reality and its Representation

It is obvious that if one is to consider the problem of “red pill / blue pill” in architectural representation, the architect has decided to swallow the “blue pill”. Nowadays, most of the architectural imagery is soaked in a blossoming happiness with nauseating effects and always overly controlled and precise to the point of acquiring non-humanistic tones. And despite the high level of legibility, what you see is not what you get. The result is hard on the edge but slimy on the inside. It can be grasped, but when confronted or squeezed it slips away.

This advanced seminar in architecture will start from the premise that representation may produce rather than repeat reality. Via thorough analysis of past and present modes of architectural representation, we will engage in speculations about a future reality shaped by responsibility, acceptance, and inclusion.

While the main structure of the class is lecture based, we will often operate in a design studio mode through open and collective critiques. The students will be asked to constantly draw, model, and write. A minimum knowledge in computer graphics and model construction is required. Finally, the objective of this seminar is to enable the students to think very clearly about architectural representation in particular, and the world in general, while building up advanced skills in image making.

  • ARC467H1F LEC9101: Advanced Topics in Urban Design:
    Sustain and Support - Urbanism in the Military Orbit

This seminar examines accidental, clandestine, and under-acknowledged urbanisms of the US military and establishes a journalistic research method to unpack transurban phenomena and the extra-architectural in preparation for discursive analysis. Week by week, this course encourages students to apply architectural tools toward the production of a rigorous account of radical, contemporary episodes from daily life within the expanded orbit of the United States’ military operations. Working through drawing, digital models, and the production of a comprehensive visual report, students will trace an avatar’s operations as it engages military urbanism in the Learning From spirit.

  • ARC451H1S LEC9101: Advanced Topics in History and Theory of Architecture:
    Written Out of History; Architecture in Europe Since 1945

This lecture course revisits European architecture since 1945, with a focus on what is standing in the shadow of the continent’s greatest hits. It looks at a range of lesser known people, projects and episodes, such as Friis og Moltke’s welfare state architecture in and around Aarhus; urban middle class housing in Rome and Milan; the architecture in the Swiss canton of Ticino before the ‘Ticino School’; and tourist infrastructure in the South of France, former Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and Rumania.

By addressing other echelons of designers than the most familiar names, and other architecture than the most famous projects, the course aims to broaden students’ understanding of the history of architecture in Europe. The emphasis on architecture that is often only mentioned in passing, relegated to footnotes, or completely ignored, allows for a discussion of the mechanisms behind the writing of history. During this course, students have to write 12 short lecture/reading responses, and an essay on an underexposed European architectural project of their choice.

  • ARC480H1S LEC9101: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Architecture:
    Lazy Computing

If our current design software has enabled a transformative re-allocation of an architect’s labor, it has also resulted in a posture of disciplinary nonchalance. In efforts to consolidate repetitive inputs through the integration of constraints, object properties and “families”, today’s automata have made the production of architectural form incredibly easy. The ability for walls to stand up straight without falling over, for objects to float in electronic space or collide without impact are all representational behaviors of stillness we have engrained into our software for our convenient use as practitioners. However, difficulties arise when the suspension of materiality and physical forces are ignored when translating the simulative object into the physical realm.

In response to the embedded constraints that define contemporary digital practice, the focus of this course leans toward inconvenient motion made easy – utilizing the tension between an object’s physicality and digital simulation to become a new working method. In this course, we will examine the implications of our commands, constraints and OS interactions towards adjacent disciplinary polemics. Students will be asked to develop their digital skill sets through the production of architectural animations and unconventional usages of everyday computational platforms. To compliment the application of these skills, students will be asked to work in teams in the presentation of weekly readings, and in driving student-led debates based on conflicting positions in digital discourse.

Through a series of computational exercises that fit within a broader contextual framework, students will explore the rapidly shrinking gap between the digital abstraction of form, its resolution and eventual production into the built environment.

  • ARC482H1S LEC9101: Advanced Topics in the Technology of Urbanism:
    Drawing Out Urban Interfaces

A drone glides unbothered through Bangkok’s sky. Here Thai media artist, Korakrit Arunanondchai, employs the aerial view in revealing the urban form and life of Thailand’s capital city. In a climactic scene the artist faces a hovering drone, the artist then extends his hand and touches the opposing figure. This scene enacts one of the most prevalent forms of relationship today – that of human-machine interaction (HMI). While Arunanondchai’s gesture is actual, he physically touches a machine, this type of interaction more commonly occurs mediated by a collection of interfaces that have become central to how people move, orient themselves, and narrate their experience of cities.

This advanced seminar in the technology of urbanism will investigate a territory for design much broader than the traditionally defined city. One aspect of this is the ascendance of network culture since the 1960s, in which the interface – a user’s site of contact with digital networks – joins older forms of media (e.g. streets, pipes, power lines, etc.) as infrastructures through which societies organize themselves. Here, the role of private enterprise in building and maintaining the present-moment’s most common interfaces cannot be overlooked.

In this hybrid seminar/lab students will engage an expanded definition of urbanism through reading in architectural history and theory, skills-based workshops in physical computing, and the creation of a prototype. It models a method of design research relevant for students interested in engaging questions pertaining to design practice, technology, and the city. Student’s will develop their prototype through a term-long investigation into an extraterritorial environmental condition. In this regard, the course explores urban interfaces as infrastructures for creating new kinds of relationships between people and place, as Korakrit’s use of the drone demonstrates.

Past Course Descriptions

The following are the archived course descriptions from previous terms for unique course offerings outside of the regular sessional timetable.